Write For Us

Updated Oct. 1, 2018

Canadian Nurse is inviting submissions in both new and existing article categories.

With the launch of our all-digital format in early 2019, we plan to feature more articles on patient outcomes, workplace improvements and other topics in practice, education, policy, research and administration. Content will include stories about successes and challenges in the workplace, in-depth analyses, opinion pieces, profiles, research summaries, advice from experts and insights into all aspects of the profession. Please note that we are no longer accepting original research papers for peer review.

Style

Since Canadian Nurse is a magazine with a broad-based readership (not an academic journal), submissions written by a single author that have a distinct point of view work best.

Overall, your work should seek to inform, inspire conversations and support nurses in their practice. With these goals in mind, we ask that you

  • focus on what nurses need to know
  • organize your ideas around a central premise that holds together
  • use plain, clear, concise language
  • emphasize the active voice
  • avoid nursing jargon and lengthy quotations.

Having good ideas that are well expressed and well structured is more important than perfect grammar or precise word count. If your manuscript is accepted, it will be edited for clarity and consistency with Canadian Nurse style while keeping your original voice.

Finding the best fit

Before you send us your work, it’s important to first figure out how it fits into the article categories we publish. The guidelines in the next section should help you find the best match. If you’re still not sure, email us (editor@canadian-nurse.com). We’ll be happy to assist.

We cannot accept previously published material (print or online) or manuscripts under consideration by other publications. We do not publish term papers, literature reviews, book reviews, poems or obituaries.

What we’re looking for

We invite submissions from Canadian nurses and nursing students in the following categories:

Commentary

Sound off on an important issue and stimulate discussion among your colleagues.

Criteria

  • single contributor
  • first-person perspective
  • conversational style
  • 600-word maximum
  • no references

Feature NEW!

Help readers further their understanding of key policy, practice, education or workplace issues. For example, examine a project, program or procedure in depth (e.g., a clinical how-to, a case study or a way to apply guidelines) or focus on current events or nursing history.

Criteria

  • up to two contributors
  • first-person perspective (use I or we)
  • informal style
  • 1,500-2,500 words
  • references: if used, include no more than 10

Promising Practices

Describe a program or project you were involved with that was designed to address a challenge or problem.

Criteria

  • up to three contributors
  • first-person perspective (use I, we or the team)
  • narrative style
  • 1,500-word maximum
  • references: if used, include no more than three
  • follow these guidelines

Reflection

Share a personal or professional experience and convey lessons learned and the insights you gained.

Criteria

  • single contributor
  • first-person perspective
  • conversational style
  • 1,400-word maximum
  • no references

Study Showcase NEW!

Pick a research study that has improved your practice, led to better patient outcomes, brought economic value to your organization or influenced your thinking. The only restriction is that you choose a study you were not involved in. In plain language, discuss the research aim and what the study concluded. Then explain why you think this paper should be on every nurse’s reading list.

Criteria

  • single contributor
  • first-person perspective
  • informal style
  • 600-word maximum
  • include a full version of the study (Word or PDF) with your submission

Turning Point NEW!

Describe a technique, process or procedure, developed by someone else, that you or your team have adopted (or adapted) for use in your workplace. It can have a clinical, administrative, policy or educational focus. Explain why you began using it and what the benefits have been.

Criteria

  • up to three contributors
  • first-person perspective (use I, we or the team)
  • narrative style
  • 600-word maximum
  • references: if used, include no more than three

References

References (i.e., for Feature, Promising Practices, Turning Point) must be complete. Include a link, if available. Follow APA style: an author-date system for in-text citations, an alphabetical reference list at the end and no endnotes or footnotes.

Photos and supplementary materials

We encourage you to submit high-resolution digital photos to accompany your manuscript. Images must be a minimum of 300 dpi at 100 per cent final size.

What to include:

  • caption information (name(s) and context)
  • photo credits (name of photographer or company)
  • releases obtained from all identifiable persons in your photos

Canadian Nurse reserves the right to make the final decision on all images and caption information.

For other materials (e.g., graphics, audio, video), please contact us.

Sending your manuscript

Submit your manuscript as a Word attachment to editor@canadian-nurse.com. Send any photos as attachments, i.e., not embedded in the manuscript.

Include the following in the body of your email:

  • author first and last names
  • daytime phone number
  • author credentials, job title and place of employment
  • article category the submission is meant for

After you submit

We will acknowledge receipt of your submission within a week. After an initial assessment, we will accept or reject the manuscript, request revisions or send it for external review. We do our best to let authors know that decision within eight weeks.

If accepted, your manuscript will go through an editing process, during which you’ll get the chance to review and respond. Canadian Nurse reserves the right to make final decisions on title and copy changes. Before we publish, we’ll ask you to complete a declaration of authorship form and agree to transfer copyright to the Canadian Nurses Association.

Other ways for you to contribute

Nurse to Know

Nominate Canadian nurses we should profile.

We’re looking for those who have advanced the profession, made a difference in patients’ lives or in the community, inspired other nurses or faced challenges that helped them grow.

Send us the nurse’s name and contact information, along with a brief explanation of why you think this person deserves to be a Nurse to Know.

Day in the Life NEW!

Help us offer a glimpse into the workday of a nurse colleague. Email us a short paragraph explaining why you think this person’s routine would interest other nurses. Be sure to include the nurse’s name and contact information.

Feedback letter

Your chance to comment on an article or give a concise opinion on an issue that’s important to you. Include your name, professional credentials, daytime phone number and complete mailing address with your emailed letter. Maximum length is 250 words. Submissions may be edited for length and clarity.

Suggest a story idea

If you’re dealing with a workplace challenge or know of a practice problem or success story your colleagues should be made aware of, let us know. We may be able to assign a writer to pursue the topic. We’re also interested in hearing about nursing roles and practice settings that are unique in some way.


Promising Practices

Introduction & Background
Describe your practice setting, and explain the specific problem/challenge you faced and the effect it was having (e.g., on patient outcomes, patient safety, patient satisfaction, staff morale, workplace health). Where did the idea for the promising practice come from?

Highlights
What is the promising practice? What are its key features? Who was responsible for developing and implementing it? What was the timeframe (from conception through implementation to evaluation) for the program/project?

Implementation
Explain how the promising practice was implemented (e.g., by a committee, in a workshop).
Describe any challenges with implementation, including staff or patient buy-in and administration. Was new funding required? If so, where did it come from?

Results
How well did the promising practice work? How were results tracked and evaluated?

Lessons Learned
What did you learn from the experience? Is there anything you would have done differently?

Next Steps
Will the promising practice continue? Who is responsible for maintaining it? Will it continue to be funded? Are you planning to make any refinements to it? Will it be rolled out to a larger group or in another setting?